World Markets Live - January 20 - CNBC Live Events
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CNBC Live Events

World Markets Live - January 20

We’ll be updating you throughout the day with essential breaking news, data alerts, earnings reports and all the major market movements.

  • Good Morning everyone. Inauguration day is upon us. With just hours to go until Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, tensions remain as his Treasury Secretary nominee break ranks on the dollar.  

    But the World Economic Forum is not finished yet and we have a great number of guests joining us through the day today. Stay tuned as we bring you all the latest!

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  • There's "a lot of nervousness" in the entire Asia-Pacific region ahead of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump's inauguration later in the global day, said former U.S. ambassador to China, Gary Locke.

    Speaking to CNBC's Squawk Box, Locke said the region—including nemesis China—was waiting to see exactly what the new administration would do amid Trump's tough talk on trade.

    "A lot of people are simply waiting," he added. Locke was ambassador to China from 2011 to 2014 in the Obama administration.
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  • Let's take a look at how U.S. stocks have been doing since U.S. elections. While there was an initial sell-off following the results, Wall Street has been in rally mode since then. Will this rally last?

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  • Britain is on the brink of  "momentous change." Those were the words of UK Prime Minister Theresa May, who told delegates in her keynote speech at Davos that uncertain times lay ahead following Britain's decision to exit the EU.

    In a subsequent interview the British leader told Steve Sedgwick in Davos that people must accept that globalization has left some behind. This comment in tandem with a commitment to free trade.

    She says she wants to see a close strategic partnership with the EU.



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  • Here are your top headlines:

    • Inauguration day is upon us. With just hours to go until Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, tensions remain as his Treasury Secretary nominee breaks ranks on the dollar.  
    • Billionaire investor George Soros brands Trump a 'would-be dictator', who is going to fail, and warns markets will reverse once he takes office. 
    • Theresa May meets top Wall Street bankers as a slew of lenders unveil plans to move jobs out of London. But the U.K. Prime Minister tells CNBC the country is open for business post-Brexit. 
    • But the view from Europe is less rosy, as the Dutch leader Mark Rutte tells CNBC Britain is taking itself back into the 1970s.
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  • Less than 11 hours until Donald Trump will take the oath of office! 

    The final preparations are underway for inauguration today, as Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States. A Spokesman said the President-elect is preparing to sign executive actions to roll back a number of President Obama's policies on his first day.



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  • President-elect Trump has promised to ramp up infrastructure spending in the United States. He has advocated what he describes as "America's Infrastructure First" policy to support investments in transportation, clean water, and electric. 

    Uwe Krueger, CEO, Atkins joins us live from Davos to discuss infrastructure spending in the U.S.
    Increase of infrastructure spending is largely needed in the U.S. We all see the deplorable nature of infrastructure, be it roads or rails or airports. Nothing is going to happen overnight so we see a gradual increase of infrastructure spending.

    I think we will have a broad energy mix emerge in the U.S. as the mainstream development. I am confident that will be the mainstream thought.

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  • Russia's economy could grow 2 percent in 2017 in case of no external shocks like a new fall in oil prices, Economy Minister Maxim Oreshkin said on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos.

    He also said the central bank could soon start buying foreign currency to help the finance ministry sterilize excessive budget revenues above $40 per barrel but added it would not mean Russia would depart from its policies of a freely floating rouble.
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  • Here are your top headlines at this hour with CNBC's Uptin:


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  • Here are your top stories at this hour:

    • Inauguration day is upon us. With just hours to go until Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, tensions remain as his Treasury Secretary nominee breaks ranks on the dollar.  
    • Billionaire investor George Soros brands Trump a 'would-be dictator', who is going to fail, and warns markets will reverse once he takes office. 
    • Theresa May meets top Wall Street bankers as a slew of lenders unveil plans to move jobs out of London. But the U.K. Prime Minister tells CNBC the country is open for business post-Brexit. 
    • But the view from Europe is less rosy, as the Dutch leader Mark Rutte tells CNBC Britain is taking itself back into the 1970s.
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  • Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte gave a downbeat assessment on Thursday of the U.K.'s vote to leave the European Union, saying that the British people chose to become poorer for the sake of controlling immigration.

    This was the choice, the choice always was that when you want economic growth, being part of the biggest market in the world — which the European Union is — to leave that market with all the consequences that entails, there's consequences you have to face up to.


    The sad thing is that I believe that, at the end of the day, that net immigration into the U.K. will not come down, because also in the future they will need many workers also from Eastern Europe to fill the many vacancies.
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  • Meanwhile, Carolin caught up with the Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg and asked her if she was worried about growing economic protectionism.

    I think British politicians are better on deciding what they want to do for their country than foreign politicians are. They know the mood, they know their business they know what is the most important. What I hope is that we get an agreement that is functioning both for Britain and for Europe and for those member countries of the single market who are not members of the European Union because I think it's important that we continue to have growth in Europe. 


    I have spoken to Donald Trump but he did not say that Nato was obsolete in the discussion with me nor with any other Nato countries. He has said that he is a great supporter of Nato, he just wants us to pay a little bit more of the bill, which also Obama wanted to do and all American presidents have. I think it's very important that an organization like Nato answers to today's security issues. 

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  • Ahold Delhaize posted a near 55 percent rise in fourth quarter sales. The retailer said it had a solid holiday season and expects full year operating margin to improve.

    We asked the CEO Dick Boer here at Davos for his 2017 outlook.
    Of course we first have to cycle from deflation to at least neutral and then inflation. I don't think it will be easily to pass through higher prices because we are in a competitive market. 

    Well first of all of course optimism is good for customers and that we see overall in the world and also in the United States. First it has to be proven. The president will only be in the White House tomorrow as of tomorrow. He has a lot of plans which hopefully also delivers higher growth and more income for our customers and that hopefully we will see back in more spending in our stores. 
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  • It's not just CEOs and politicians who are here in Davos. Hollywood superstar Matt Damon has made an appearance to drum up support for his water charity, "Water dot org." This after receiving a multi-million dollar commitment from Belgian brewer Stella Artois. 

    CNBC caught up with the "Bourne" actor and asked him whether he was nervous about a Donald Trump presidency. 
    A successful American President is good for all of us, and we really have to, you know, be rooting for him right now. Obviously, it's no secret that I didn't vote for him, but-, and yes, I think there is a sense of-, we're heading into new territory here, you know. He's obviously not a career politician, he's not-, you know, he's been occupied with his own business interests, which are relatively narrow, given the scope of what a president actually has to deal with, so I imagine he's really working hard right now


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  • Amjad Bseisu, CEO, EnQuest joins us live from Davos to discuss energy outlook:

    We are seeing more stability in energy prices, the OPEC accord has helped. I think the prices are good for the industry and for the consumers. I see more upside than downside.

    Oil is a global commodity and there is no taxation on selling it so the impact is actually positive with the lower pound. 

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  • John Paulson: Increased long exposure to stocks after Trump’s win

    CNBCThe hedge fund manager echoed many in the business community who are optimistic about the Trump administration's policies.
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  • George Soros has warned markets will not do very well under Donald Trump, adding that the president-elect will be a failure. Speaking at a media dinner at the World Economic Forum, the billionaire investor said Trump's policies are contradictory and will ultimately have a negative impact on American and global growth. 


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  • Here's what top European lenders' CEOs have told us about bonus pay here at Davos.

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  • Sergey Lavrov, Russia's foreign affairs minister, says there are positive signs being observed in the Syria peace process, according to Reuters reports. He says peace talks in Astana are an important step towards establishing a framework for talks in Geneva.

    Lavrov also said Russia is ready to move to constructive dialogue with the U.S.
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  • There’s been a management shakeup for Geox. The Italian shoe brand appointed Gregorio Borgo as its new CEO this month, who joined the firm from the Pirelli Group.

    Mario Moretti Polegato, founder & chairman at Geox, discusses the appointment.

    We decided a few days ago to change our CEO. The new CEO came from Pirelli. He was one of the top managers in Pirelli, because he has a lot of experience in the Far East market. GEOX now is a global brand because we are in more than 100 countries worldwide.


    Most of our business is concentrated in Europe. Now we’re going to develop it and grow our investment in China, for example, and the United States.
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  • The London Metropolitan Police have warned of protests in London ahead of Donald Trump's inauguration in the U.S.


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  • ECB Board Member Benoit Coeure spoke to CNBC at the World Economic Forum in Davos. The interview is coming up in just a few minutes.


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  • Julia spoke with ECB Board Member Benoit Coeure, and asked if better ECB data was providing the hawks with ammunition.

    What we have decided in December has been instrumental in maintaining the right financial conditions which given the uncertainty and shocks coming from outside is really useful.


    Growth is firming up so recovery is unfolding in a very solid way. Inflation is creeping up and we spent most of the meeting discussing the sustainability and the conclusion is we need to know more before passing judgement on inflation. 


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  • ECB Board Member Benoit Coeure talks to CNBC exclusively. Here's what he has to say about ECB's plans to taper the bond-buying program:

    We will be able to taper when we have to taper. We still don't have to taper.

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  • ECB Board Member Benoit Coeure talks to CNBC exclusively. He says euro zone is much more resilient than three years ago:

    If you take a look back, euro zone is much more resilient that it was 2-3 years ago. Reforms has started in countries, growth is much higher. We would like to be sure that euro zone can withstand global shock and for that we need to be even stronger. 

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  • Ten minutes to Europe open and stock futures point to a mixed open ahead of the inauguration of soon-to-be U.S. President Donald Trump.

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  • Bill Browder, CEO at Hermitage Capital Management, says it is uncharacteristic of President Putin not to respond to the latest round of U.S. sanctions. 

    He argues this suggests Russia is "waiting for some type of gift from the President-elect" Donald Trump. Here, he comments on the future of Putin-Trump relations.

    There is no relationship yet and there’s all sorts of hopes from Russia. There’s been a few tweets from Trump. But on the other side there is an administration, a foreign policy and security administration that Mr. Trump has put underneath him that is entirely hawkish towards Russia.


    If the Russia policy is driven by the defense secretary, the head of the CIA, head of homeland security or various others, than Russians aren’t going to get any gifts.
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  • Bill Browder, CEO at Hermitage Capital Management, says Trump’s friendly approach towards Putin is “bewildering.”

    It doesn’t make any sense why he would be so unfriendly towards a lot of our allies and then so friendly towards a country that is an adversary to the United States.
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  • European markets are now open, moving to the downside.

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  • The telecoms sector is leading towards the upside, but making only marginal gains.

    Meanwhile, basic resources are falling and the autos sector is making losses on concerns about new tariffs that may be introduced by Donald Trump on vehicles made outside the U.S.

     
     

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  • The major European bourses are also recording losses at the start of trade today.

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  • Here are the winners and losers in European trade following the opening bell.

    Ubi Banca shares are up strongly, at their highest since April 2016. Edenred is trailing at the bottom of the index on news that Colony's Colday E sold its entire stake in the company, representing 5.68 percent of share capital.

     
     

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  • Christian Ulbrich, CEO at JLL joins us live from Davos to discuss properties post-Brexit:

    For 2017 we hope the growth is picking up, the uncertainty is there but one thing that will always be a round - London is the safe haven of the world. we have seen Chinese investors coming in and they will continue to.

    Sterling has fallen quite significantly so that price advantage is noticeable. I think we have a way to go until that would happen. 


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  • Casper von Koskull, CEO at Nordea Bank, discusses banking regulations.

    I think we do need to look at regulations as well, that we need to calibrate that it’s right. I think now we are come to that point where it will be more evidence based.

    We should actually view what we have in place and get on with business. We do need to actually also restructure our business. Focus on the core, become more efficient.

    On the topic of whether banks need more capital or have too much, he had this to say.

    Capital is important, but capital isn’t everything. Trust is not only capital and hence now I think we have come now to the point where we need to look at other things as well.
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  • Arancha González, Executive Director at International Trade Center joins us live from Davos to talk about Donald Trump's protectionist policies:

    Rhetoric at the moment is rather on the negative side. But we will have to see if this rhetoric translates into action. When translating this rhetoric US will see where their interests lie.

    I worry in today's world we go from a rules-based trading system to a deals-based trading system. I think especially for all countries around the world and two-thirds of them that are weaker.

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  • Oil climbed for a second day on Friday underpinned by expectations of tighter supply and on reports of record Chinese demand, but prices remained under pressure from rising U.S. crude and gasoline inventories.

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) said that while it was "far too soon" to gauge OPEC members' compliance with promised cuts, commercial oil inventories in the developed world fell for a fourth consecutive month in November, with another decline projected for December. 

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  • These are the top headlines following the European market open.

    • Inauguration day is upon us. With just hours to go until Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, tensions remain as his Treasury Secretary nominee breaks ranks on the dollar.  
    • Billionaire investor George Soros brands Trump a 'would-be dictator', who is going to fail, and warns markets will reverse once he takes office.
    • Theresa May meets top Wall Street bankers as a slew of lenders unveil plans to move jobs out of London. But the U.K. Prime Minister tells CNBC the country is open for business post-Brexit.
    • It's too early to taper. That's the message from ECB Executive Board Member Benoit Coeure, who tells CNBC exclusively the central bank's policy is still working.
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  • Argentina's treasury minister says he has "non-negotiable commitment" to reduce the country's fiscal deficit, according to Reuters.

    Speaking at Davos, Nicolás Dujovne says any extra income the country makes will be used to cut the deficits.

    He adds that he aims to present tax reforms to the president this year, but says the government is not pursuing any changes to labour rules.
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  • Donald Trump's presidency could bring Europe out of America's shadow. That's according to Eurogroup President Jeroen Dijsselbloem who spoke at CNBC's Europe panel. 

    We've been under the American umbrella for a very long time - the whole post war period. And if I take the president elect seriously, and I think we should, that umbrella is going to go away to some extent which may be a good thing for Europe. Maybe we need to leave home maybe we need to come more independent and really really think about our position on the global stage


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  • The agrichemicals industry is facing a wave of consolidation with potential tie-ups between Syngenta and Chemchina, Dow and Dupont and Bayer and Monsanto. At Davos we spoke to the CEO of Syngenta and asked him about the shifting landscape in the sector. 

    Big changes! We'll have 2 less competitors which changes the landscape and 2 stronger competitors. Agriculture needs a lot of tech and you'll see vigorous competition going forward. Certainly a different landscape when you have 5 companies involved in seed protection products going to 3. That's a big change. That's why the regulators are looking at it so closely.




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  • Svein Tore Holsether, president & CEO at Yara International, discusses problems facing the agro-chemical industry.

    We’re still facing a market that is oversupplied. There’s still more capacity coming in in the nitrogen part of the fertilizer business and for us in Yara it’s about what we can do something about. 

    We have launched initiatives to improve our bottom line with our $500 million improvement program to counter some of the impacts we will have from an oversupplied market.
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  • France to hold two Green bond investor calls on Friday. That's according to Reuters.
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  • UK Finance Minister Hammond says UK economy effectively at full employment, will continue to need migrants. He says open question whether migration for EU nationals will be easier than for those from outside EU after Brexit, up for negotiation.
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  • These are the headlines at the top of the hour.

    • Inauguration day is upon us. With just hours to go until Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, tensions remain as his Treasury Secretary nominee breaks ranks on the dollar.  
    • Billionaire investor George Soros brands Trump a 'would-be dictator', who is going to fail, and warns markets will reverse once he takes office.
    • It's too early to taper. That's the message from ECB Executive Board Member Benoit Coeure, who tells CNBC exclusively the central bank's policy is still working.
    • Theresa May meets top Wall Street bankers as a slew of lenders unveil plans to move jobs out of London. But the U.K. Prime Minister tells CNBC the country is open for business post-Brexit.
    Comment ()
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