World Markets Live - March 30 - CNBC Live Events
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World Markets Live - March 30

We’ll be updating you throughout the day with essential breaking news, data alerts, earnings reports and all the major market movements.

  • Good Morning everyone. So Brexit is triggered and we are now into the 2 year-long negotiation period. Markets had a somewhat muted reaction to Article 50 trigger on Wednesday as most of it was priced it. European stocks are again expected to open slightly higher this morning. Here's a look at morning futures from IG index:
     
    FTSE 100               7367 +6
    DAX 30                  12222 +22
    CAC 40                  5072 +10
    FTSE MIB             20283 +29
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  • Here are your top headlines at this hour:
     
    • President Donald Trump looks to resuscitate his health-care plan, warning Obamacare is about to explode. But Speaker Paul Ryan warns he shouldn't turn to the Democrats after failing to get Republican support. 
    • At the Arctic Forum, what do President Trump's energy policies mean for development of the region? CNBC speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Finnish and Icelandic counterparts about the outlook for the Artic.
    • Britain prepares to publish details of its 'Great Repeal Bill' as Brexit Minister David Davis says its time to 'end the supremacy of lawmakers in Brussels'.
       
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  • Paul Ryan has said he doesn't want to work with Democrats on healthcare, as President Trump has proposed. In an interview the House Speaker said he feared the Republican party is pushing Trump to the other side of the aisle after last week's bill collapse.
     
    Ryan also told reporters yesterday that he will continue to work on reforming and repealing Obamacare and that progress is being made to bring the party together.
     
    I don't want us to become a factionalized majority. i want us to become a unified majority. And that means we're going to sit down and talk things out until we get there. And that's exactly what we're doing.
     
     Paul Ryan, House GOP Address Press After Republican Party Conference : News Photo
    Source: Getty Images
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  • Meanwhile, President Trump's approval levels have dropped to new lows. According to the latest Gallup poll, 35 percent approve of Trump. His disapproval rating jumped to 59 percent in the wake of last week's failed healthcare bill.
     
    The approval figure is much lower than recent presidents at this point in their first term, who - Gallup says - have had approval ratings of 53 percent or higher.
     
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  • Stay tuned as we live blog the panel:
     
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  • Ivanka Trump has taken up an official role at the White House. The First Daughter announced that she will serve as an unpaid 'Assistant to the President' in a move to relieve ethics concerns about her role. NBC's Kristen Welker has the details.

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  • Geoff Cutmore caught up with Russian energy minister Alexander Novak on the sidelines of the International Arctic Forum in Russia. Here's what he had to say:
     
    Firstly I would like to say that we respect the energy policy that other countries have. That is the sovereign right of each country. And undoubtedly, with the estimates and forecasts for oil supply in the market, for the increase in demand, we are working on the basis of which objectives and goals we are facing both for the country and the large companies which have a significant influence on the market. The United States is a large country that produces a lot of oil and at the same time is a big consumer. But on the whole, in my view, we need to look at global production, at global demand and calculate the balance and this is also being done by the International Energy Agency and other organisations that are involved in forecasts. 
     
     Day 1 of 2017 Arctic: Territory of Dialogue International Arctic Forum : News Photo
    Source: Getty Images
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  • President Donald Trump still wants Obamacare replaced — but it's got to be done with "a good deal," not "a bad deal."

    White House spokesman Sean Spicer, when asked how realistic it is to expect an Obamacare replacement effort to be successfully "resurrected" by Trump, said Wednesday "I think he'd like to get it done."

    But Spicer said any replacement plan would have to include Trump's stated goals of "lowering costs" of health insurance for Americans, and giving them "more options" to choose from than is now the case under the Affordable Care Act.
     
    However, speaker Paul Ryan has said he doesn't want to work with Democrats on healthcare, as President Trump has proposed. In an interview the House Speaker said he feared the Republican party is pushing Trump to the other side of the aisle after last week's bill collapse.

    Ryan also told reporters yesterday that he will continue to work on reforming and repealing Obamacare and that progress is being made to bring the party together.
     
    I don't want us to become a factionalized majority. i want us to become a unified majority. And that means we're going to sit down and talk things out until we get there. And that's exactly what we're doing.
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  • EU Commission President Jean Claude Juncker said that Britain will one day regret its choice of leaving the European Union. Speaking at an open debate in Malta, he also said this is the moment for Europe to be united. Meanwhile, EU's Chief Negotiator Michel Barnier said that the road ahead for Britain will be difficult.
     
    CNBC's Willem Marx is in Malta, tracking the latest:
    In the past few years, a lot of things coming out of Brussels is something that riles people up in the UK. Today we are going to try and talk to some European leaders, they are gathered in Malta to talk about a number of issues. Clearly Brexit is going to be high on agenda.
     
     
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  • Here are your top headlines at this hour:
     
    • President Donald Trump looks to resuscitate his healthcare plan, warning Obamacare is about to explode. But Speaker Paul Ryan warns he shouldn't turn to the Democrats after failing to get Republican support. 
    • At the Arctic Forum, what do President Trump's energy policies mean for development of the region? CNBC speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Finnish and Icelandic counterparts about the outlook for the Artic.
    • Britain prepares to publish details of its 'Great Repeal Bill' as Brexit Minister David Davis says its time to 'end the supremacy of lawmakers in Brussels'.
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  • Let's take a look at global markets this morning with CNBC's Karen Tso

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  • Crude prices are on the rise for a third straight day as hopes for an OPEC, non-OPEC deal extension continue to outweigh large U.S. inventories.
     
    Geoff spoke with Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak on the sidelines of the International Arctic Forum in Russia:
    In my opinion, we are seeing a gradual stabilization of the market. An increase in market demand after the winter decrease. Currently, we see that the reserve growth is falling with each week. This is an indication of an improvement in the situation in the market. There is little doubt that the main factor influencing this is a reduction in production by the countries that signed the agreement on 10 December in Vienna. OPEC members and countries that are not members of OPEC. Currently, there is a reduction of approximately, one and a half million barrels a day coming onto the market. The overall compliance is fairly high at 94% and we will be following this compliance as we move forward. 
     
    Day 1 of 2017 Arctic: Territory of Dialogue International Arctic Forum : News Photo
     
    Russia is reducing its oil production in stages, in accordance with the plans that we worked out voluntarily with our production companies. And in addition, I can tell you that the decrease in production in January and February were ahead of tempo with regards our initial plans. Currently, in March we have already reached a reduction level of 200,000 barrels a day. We anticipate complying with the figure set forth in the agreement by the end of April. This will be a reduction of 300,000 barrels. 
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  • Clothing retailer Lululemon appears to be falling out of fashion with investors. The company's stock dropped sharply after it posted full year guidance which indicated that consumer demand for 'athleisure' wear could have peaked. 
     
     
     

     
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  • Shares in Toyota are edging lower after the automaker announced that it's recalling 2.9 million vehicles amid concerns over faulty airbags. The latest announcement from the Japanese automaker forms part of a larger programme of recalls.  
     
     
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  • Samsung has unveiled its newest Smartphone - the Galaxy S8.  It is the company's first release since the recall of its Note 7 last year.
     
     
    There was an initial setback after Note 7 but what you see from consumer surveys, consumers have been sticking with the Samsung brand so when the Note 7 was recalled, those customers were trading Note 7 for Galaxy S7 and S7 edge which was the current flagship smartphone for Samsung.
     
     
     
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  • Samsung launches the Galaxy S8 with its own Apple Siri rival called Bixby

    CNBCThe device comes in two models with different screen sizes - the 5.8-inch Galaxy S8 and 6.2-inch Galaxy S8 Plus.
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  • Here are your top headlines at this hour:
     
    • President Donald Trump looks to resuscitate his healthcare plan, warning Obamacare is about to explode. But Speaker Paul Ryan warns he shouldn't turn to the Democrats after failing to get Republican support. 
    • At the Arctic Forum, what do President Trump's energy policies mean for development of the region? CNBC speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Finnish and Icelandic counterparts about the outlook for the Artic.
    • Britain prepares to publish details of its 'Great Repeal Bill' as Brexit Minister David Davis says its time to 'end the supremacy of lawmakers in Brussels'.
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  • ECB officials have reportedly been caught off guard by what they describe as a market over-reaction to its March meeting, according to Reuters. 
     
    After ECB policy makers tweaked guidance in March, yields rose as the central bank seemed to hint at the possibility of a rate hike before the end of easing, forcing the borrowing costs up for countries like Italy, Spain and Portugal.
     
    Officials say that in the April meeting, the ECB will stress to investors that the easy-money policy will stay in place for now. 
     
     
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  • Lloyd's of London has announced a profit of £2.1bn for 2016 despite the combined ratio moving from 90.0% to 97.9%. The company has also announced that following the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union, a subsidiary office will be opened in Brussels with the intention that it will be operational for the January 1st renewal season in 2019.
     
    John Nelson, Chairman, Lloyd's joins us live to discuss the results:
     
    We have worked very hard in the past few years to basically put in a plan for EU. We have come up I think with a very efficiently and well-crafted solution which we think will allow the Lloyd's market to operate onshore EU starting at the end of 2018. We looked at a short list of countries and we had to choose one and we chose Brussels.
     
     
    In the short term, there is no measurable impact of Brexit. We are continuing to operate within the EU regime. The whole point of the plan that we have announced this morning is that we can continue to operate in the EU from the customer, the insurer point of view basically seamlessly.
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  • Europe futures point to a higher start to the trading day as investors come to terms with the official launch of Brexit proceedings and digest reports regarding the European Central Bank (ECB).
     
     
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  • Here are your top headlines at this hour:
     
    • President Donald Trump looks to resuscitate his healthcare plan, warning Obamacare is about to explode. But Speaker Paul Ryan warns he shouldn't turn to the Democrats after failing to get Republican support. 
    • At the Arctic Forum, what do President Trump's energy policies mean for development of the region? CNBC speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Finnish and Icelandic counterparts about the outlook for the Artic.
    • Britain prepares to publish details of its 'Great Repeal Bill' as Brexit Minister David Davis says its time to 'end the supremacy of lawmakers in Brussels'.
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  •  The dollar edged up to a nine-day high against a basket of currencies on Thursday, with the euro sagging as the European Central Bank showed no sign of stepping away from monetary easing anytime soon.
     
     
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  • Tonight it's the annual Investors Choice Awards, to honour fund managers who judges determine are the best in the business.
     
    Ryan Kalish, the co-founder of Allocator which is hosting the awards evening, comments on how the industry is performing.
     
    We had seen as a whole the industry in certain strategies has had some disappointing returns compared to the S&P 500 and the overall stock market, but if we look at the short-listed managers who join us this evening, the average performance is over 15 percent, which is a lot higher than the overall markets.
     
    Kalish added that some managers are performing even better than that, achieving 50 percent returns.
     
     
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  • Markus Taraba, the founder of Monterone Partners, argues that small caps provide protection from volatility stemming from Brexit and the rise of populism.
     
    What we looked at is global businesses that have broad revenues streams. So only about 5 percent of revenues are coming from the U.K., so we can mitigate against any short-term headwinds in the U.K. economy.
     
     
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  • Asian shares fell on Thursday after a mixed start, amid uncertainty over the U.K.'s exit from the European Union and as the dollar strengthened.
     
     
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  • Michala Marcussen, global head of economics at Societe Generale, says the one thing she would like to see in the financial sector is Europe advance on the capital markets union.
     
    I actually think if we can move on the capital markets union and build a really strong financial industry in Europe, I think that would be a fantastic source of value added for (fund managers) to work on moving ahead.
     
     
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  • Samsung has unveiled its newest Smartphone - the Galaxy S8.  It is the company's first release since the recall of its Note 7 last year.
     
    CNBC’s Arjun says he likes the specs of the new device.
     
    To be honest the cameras weren’t a massive step up from the previous phone, generally because they were pretty good anyway in the first place, one of the market leading cameras right now if you look across spectrum.
     
    I think some of the features that Samsung really pushed was this Bixby, their version of Siri essentially.  They’re pushing it in a different way, saying this is something that can control the rest of your home, but also offer you recommendations.
     
    Arjun says Samsung is trying to set Bixby apart from similar services offered by Google, Apple and Amazon.
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  • European stocks are now open for trading with the pan-European Stoxx Europe 600 opening fairly flat this morning as investors come to terms with Brexit proceedings that started on Wednesday:
     
     
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  • Major European indexes have opened in positive territory this morning, although only edging up slightly as investors come to terms with the official launch of Brexit proceedings and digest reports regarding the European Central Bank (ECB).
     
     
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  • Let's take a look at the best and the worst performing stocks this morning:
     
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  •  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given VW the go-ahead to start selling a number of its diesel vehicles in America again. That's according to a number of media reports. The German car giant has been sitting on a backlog of unsold vehicles in the country since its emissions cheating came to light in 2015. 
     
     
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  • Opposition is growing among worker representatives of Linde to plans for a merger with U.S.rival Praxair.  According to Reuters -- the German and U.S. industrial gases group are working to finalize terms of a merger that would create a 30 billion dollar market leader.
     
     
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  • Vivendi is considering putting its chief executive forward as Telecom Italia's next chairman, according to Reuters reports. The move would cause concern about the French group's growing influence over Italian companies. Vivendi is the top shareholder of Telecom Italia with 24 percent.
     
     
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  • German, French and Dutch 10-year government bond yield fall to three-week low:
     
     
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  • James Butterfill, head of research & investment strategy at ETF Securities, explains why achieving a free trade deal between the U.K. and Europe would be beneficial.
     
    It would be bonkers for the U.K. to revert to the WTO tax agreements. If you look at for instance cereals, a key export for us, under WTO agreements there would be a 41 percent tax on cereals, and if you look at other things such as vehicles it would be an 8 percent tax, on beverage there would be 4 percent.
     
    It’s not exactly a great scenario for the U.K. to revert back to WTO.
     
     
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  • British Finance Minister Hammond to visit German counterpart Schaeuble in Berlin on Thursday. That's according to the German FinMin spokeswoman.
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  • UK Brexit Minister David Davis in a BBC radio interview says did not threaten Europe over security arrangements in Brexit letter.
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  • The International Arctic Forum in Russia brings together heads of state and energy leaders to discuss development of the area.
     
    Gudlaugur Thór Thórdarson, minister for foreign affairs for Iceland, says it is important to see sustainable development in the economy.
     
    He also says the Arctic Forum gives countries in the Arctic Circle a healthy way to deal with disputes.
     
    I mentioned in my opening speech Arctic Council is one of the hottest spots on earth because of the importance here of resources and what happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic, it involves every one of us.
     
    I think it’s better that we discuss and have a bilateral agreement and discussion with those partners we do not agree with, for example Russia, than just ignore it.
     
     
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  • European Central Bank policymakers are wary of making any new change to their policy message in April after small tweaks this month upset investors and raised the specter of a surge in borrowing costs for the bloc's indebted periphery. That's according to Reuters.

    One ECB source said the bank has been overinterpreted by markets at its March 9 meeting.

    Taken aback when markets started to price in an interest rate hike early next year, policymakers are keen to reassure investors that their easy-money policy is far from ending, suggesting reluctance change message before June, six sources in and close to the Governing Council indicated.
    by Spriha Srivastava edited by luke.graham 3/30/2017 7:23:11 AM
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  • UK Brexit Minister says we want to deal with the Northern Irish border issue early in the Brexit process. We have a moral duty to the 3 million European citizens in the UK to give them certainty over their right to say, Davis told BBC radio. 
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  • Gudlaugur Thór Thórdarson, minister for foreign affairs for Iceland, discusses the impact of Brexit on Iceland’s relationship with the U.K.
     
    There’s a lot of feelings in the discussion of Brexit. At the end of the day, we have layers of co-operation with Europe. Some are EU, some are EEA.
     
    So I think it’s important that we would just find some solutions, that we will see strong economic ties and free trade with Europe as it is today.
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  • Here are your top headlines at this hour:
     
    • The Great meeting with China. President Xi is set to visit President Trump next week as talk of tariffs heat up
    • At the Arctic Forum, what do President Trump's energy policies mean for development of the region? CNBC speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Finnish and Icelandic counterparts about the outlook for the Artic.
    • Britain prepares to publish details of its 'Great Repeal Bill' as Brexit Minister David Davis says its time to 'end the supremacy of lawmakers in Brussels'.
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  • Saudi Aramco formally appoints JP Morgan Chase & Company, Morgan Stanley, HSBC as international advisers on IPO. That's according to Reuters citing sources.
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  • Let's take a look at how markets across the globe are performing with CNBC's Karen Tso.

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